Using Games Based Simulation to Prepare Healthcare Workers in Addressing Health & Safety

11/03/2016

Blog post by SimGHOSTS AUS Officer Patrea Andersen

Using Games Based Simulation to Prepare Healthcare Workers in Addressing Health & Safety

 

Facing the challenge of supporting a growing aging population is an international health concern. Health and safety is paramount in ensuring care is economically sustainable. Protecting health workers and those being cared for against Health and safety risk is paramount as is training the workforce to reduce the chance of injury and facilitate positive health outcomes.

 

Developed by the University of the Sunshine Coast in conjunction with developers Bondi Labs and industry partner Suncare, “Safe Environments” is a competency game based simulation application that focuses on work health and safety for in-facility and in-home care. The app is based on the Safety Standards and provides opportunities to improve knowledge and skills. Players are immersed in a virtual 3D environment. Over 100 hazards representing 11 categories of hazard are randomly spurned according to patient profiles and linked to environments including facility and in-home care. Park environments and a supermarket are included. The simulation tests player ability to identify and categorize hazards, determine risk and make recommendations for risk elimination/ containment and minimization. Detailed analytics and feedback are provided and a leader board utilized. 

 

As a finalist the app was recognized at the 2016 Australasian Simulation Congresses for revitalizing content that some students perceive as “dry” by using gaming technology to educate, engage learners and facilitating critical thinking. In addition to the tertiary sector the app has application in community and facility care providing education to health care workers, volunteer’s, family and friends. The generic nature of the app makes it applicable to international contexts. The App will be available on Apple App Store shortly. Further information about the app and research trial can be obtained from Associate Professor Patrea Andersen at the University of the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia.